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Polo, Bob, and Fay Jones- 24 x 30

Polo, Bob, and Fay Jones- 24 x 30


DOG STORY- Polo
Polo’s puppy story is unknown, but he appeared with his sister outside a social services organization at Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, at about 7 months old. It is assumed that Polo’s original human family reconsidered dog ownership and dumped the two dogs there. A friend of Fay’s sister took the dogs and gave the male to Fay’s sister, who lives in Taos and is an animal lover already living with four or five dogs of her own. Fay’s sister decided that Fay and Bob needed a dog, and she arranged to have the white fluffy pup flown to Seattle. Fay says, “We didn’t think we needed a dog, but now we know we did.”
Polo was named “Wrong Place” by his initial rescuer, then “Snowball” by Fay’s sister. When the dog arrived at the Jones home, Fay and Bob toyed with naming him something artsy like Cezanne, but the two artists are of two different opinions about Cezanne’s work so they decided to name him after a friend in Mexico with a name that could be either commanding like “Polo, come right now!” or soft and soothing like “awww, sweet Polo”. Fay thinks that it may not be an honor in Mexico to be named after a dog, so the friend is still in the dark about being a namesake.
Polo spends his snoozing time during the day on the couch in Bob’s studio. He is friends with the mailman, loves all visitors, and his best trick is to retrieve the beloved ball then hurl it back to the human with a particular toss of the head that gives the ball some real thrust. Fay says, “Polo is not a rascal at all, but just a sweetheart of a dog.” And I must say, being an all white dog with a contagious smile, Polo also makes an excellent compositional element in a painting.
Bob and Fay Jones are both successful artists in Seattle. The large green painting behind the couch is my version of one of Bob’s abstract paintings, and the stool is a direct takeoff from an element in one of Fay’s paintings. The other "paintings" on the wall are actually prints from their personal collection, the horse by Gwen Knight and the fragment of a print on the left wall by Michael Spafford.


 
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